The Mobile Deployment Puzzle: How to Solve It

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Deployment is an often-overlooked area of a company’s mobile strategy. Get it right, and your employees are off and running without a second thought. Get it wrong, and your mobile initiatives will suffer. Part three in our series of solution briefs will guide you through the ins and outs of deployment, including:

  • Strategies for a measured, headache-free rollout.

    Managers and employees tend to be eager to adopt new mobile devices, and their enthusiasm can put pressure on IT departments to get devices into everyone’s hands quickly. Learn what up-front work is necessary—from scripting settings to choosing the right accessories—to ensure that the devices are ready to use and that you have a protocol in place when employees need help.

  • Unexpected deployment situations.

    Sometimes it doesn’t matter how carefully you plan your deployment. Specific business scenarios call for rapid deployment and make even the most organized IT departments scramble for reinforcements. And, much as you might not expect it, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) programs have an impact on corporate rollouts, too. Read about what you can do to prepare for these situations so you can be an IT hero in times of need.

  • Soup-to-nuts deployment.

    A solid rollout has all the bases covered, including purchasing decisions, app testing, asset management, and device disposal. Even the nimblest companies can have trouble predicting the impact that their mobile deployments will have on their organizations. Learn more about the different aspects of deployment so you can stay true to your mobility goals of optimizing employee productivity and maximizing your return on investment.

Get help solving your mobile deployment puzzle today – download the solution brief.


Application ABCs: How to ensure that you’re making smart decisions about mobile apps

 

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As mobile enterprise apps become more prevalent in the marketplace, companies must face a long list of decisions before they can offer their employees this welcome efficiency boost. Part two in our series walks you through some of these considerations, including:

  • App strategies that won’t break the bank.

    Can you find off-the-shelf apps that will work for you, or do you have to build your own? You’ll only know after you figure out your mobile app needs in several key areas. If you buy apps, make sure you’ve vetted them to avoid overloading your help desk and emptying your piggy bank on the wrong tools. Learn how to develop a comprehensive app strategy that will set you on the right path and keep you from the dreaded trial-and-error approach.

  • Effective mobile app development.

    It may be possible to customize off-the-shelf apps to arrive at affordable tools that will suit your business. Or perhaps your existing desktop apps can easily be extended into your mobile environment. If not, you’ll need to enter the world of mobile app development. Learn how to weigh the pros and cons of native, web, and hybrid apps, based on factors like the nature of your mobile environment and your dev team’s areas of expertise. You’ll also need to determine which platforms to work on.

  • App delivery and ongoing management.

    You have apps in hand… now what? Read about how to distribute and manage those apps, possibly with the help of a mobile application management (MAM) solution that includes an enterprise app store. Learn how you can use MAM software to help set up and secure your apps, enable “dual-persona” environments, and set policies regarding corporate data. By getting app management right the first time, you’ll inspire user confidence and achieve the productivity gains that mobility can bring to strategic companies.

Interested in reading more? Find our solution brief on mobile enterprise apps here.

 

 

 


All about Mobility: How your company can create a long-term mobile strategy

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A revolution is taking place, and it’s happening in every corporate office across the globe. Mobile devices have completely transformed the way we work, and with the increasing capabilities of the next generation of devices, the need to incorporate mobility into your strategic planning is only going to increase.

So how do you tap into this potential? Mobile phones and tablets aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, and a successful mobile strategy will have to think long-term in order to benefit your business.

To help guide you, we’re launching a series of solution briefs covering everything from mobility planning to device deployment. We’ll be posting them on the blog frequently, so we recommend you check back regularly. Our first solution brief on enterprise mobility planning offers tips on:

How to get your strategy off the ground

Like any good plan, developing a strategy always comes first. Planning for your mobile enterprise today and tomorrow will help save you money and prevent duplication of efforts. It’ll also protect your corporate data and enable your employees to do more.

Thinking beyond the device

Blackberries used to rule the enterprise, and your mobility strategy simply involved securing the end device. Today, this is no longer the case, and now you have to take devices, apps, data, storage, content and telecom expenses into consideration.

Aligning your business goals

Take heed: don’t invest in mobility for the sake of mobility. This is the easiest way to ensure no return on your investment. Your mobility strategy must align with your business goals and not just your goals for this year, but your long-term business goals too.

Our solution brief on enterprise mobility training is available for download here.

 


Survey of IT Execs Identifies Enterprise Mobility Challenges and Trends

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Organizations talk about the value of mobility in specific terms—productivity, reduced costs, better customer service, agility in the marketplace—but to what extent are they taking steps to realize these benefits? How many even have a strategy for deploying mobility across the enterprise, much less for implementing specific mobility solutions?

A recent survey explores the status of enterprise mobility in terms of its importance to organizations, what kinds of strategies they’re developing to make mobility work, and what their concerns are about it. In other words, what are organizations actually doing about enterprise mobility right now, and what will they be doing in the next several months?

The survey of more than 200 IT executives across a range of mid- to large-size businesses offers some interesting results. Not surprising is the large number of organizations that identify enterprise mobility as an increasingly important part of their business that will play a significant part in their upcoming IT plans. Also not surprising is that many companies do not yet have a well-defined strategy for putting their ideas and plans into practice. What is surprising is just how wide the gap is: 82 percent say mobility is very important, but only 8 percent have a well-defined strategy and have executed on it.

The obstacles that prevent reluctant organizations from jumping deeper into the mobility pool are exactly what mobility solutions and solution providers are intended to address: security measures, cost management, a lack of expertise within the company, and the development and management of mobile apps. Of these, security is the biggest concern, and it overlaps with concerns about mobile apps. Organizations want to understand how apps fit into a picture that keeps corporate data separated and protected from user data. Many IT departments are aware that mobile device management (MDM) solutions can play a big part in providing this security, but very few (less than 50 percent) actually have a solution in place. (And again, even when they have one, it’s rarely part of a larger, overall strategy.)

Many organizations don’t realize how flexible and wide-ranging their mobility options are. For example, beyond MDM alone, they may not realize they can mix and match solutions for MDM, mobile application management (MAM), mobile content management (MCM), intelligence, analysis, monitoring, and so on. If they did realize this, the companies may feel more confident about going forward with deployment. (As a side note, the survey results also reinforce the importance of having a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policy to promote security and efficiency—an important reminder for the few organizations that don’t already have a one.)

Finally, the survey shows that many of the IT executives do recognize that their companies will need outside help to address their security and other concerns. Half are considering a mobility-as-a-service model, bundling services, and using outside providers for most or all of these services. Also, most of the organizations that have strategies at least partially underway are emphasizing components that make good sense as part of any strategy. That means outside providers will not have the burden of trying to sell a solution that the organizations aren’t familiar or comfortable with. Still, developing a strategy has to come before deploying any solutions. The key will be for the providers to get involved early and educate organizations on the range of services and solutions that they need and how they fit into the big picture.

To learn more about the challenges of enterprise mobility and how IT leaders plan to address them, download the full research report.